Monday, September 16, 2013

Special Ensaymada

I suppose everyone who has a favourite, tried and tested ensaymada recipe will claim that theirs is the best.  I know I would. I grew up eating only one kind and naturally, it was the standard by which every other version was compared to.

To me, the best ensaymada is soft but not too airy or cake-like.  Golden (from a generous amount of eggyolks and butter) and not pale yellow.  Buttery, sugary, and balanced off with some saltiness from a strong, tasty cheese topping.


I've learned that to achieve this perfect ensaymada, there can really be no shortcuts.  I have tried other recipes with shorter processes and different proportions of ingredients but the results didn't quite make it to the standard I was used to.  I once tried a recipe with mashed potatoes.  It yielded pillow-soft ensaymadas but to me, although they were good, they were more like cupcakes in texture.

So, yes, I have decided to stick to the real thing.  It is more tedious to make, requires more patience but the end result is definitely worth it.

A few notes:

1.  If the yeast doesn't foam, discard then start again.

2.  The proving (rising) times listed in the recipe are just guides.  These will vary mainly due to the temperature of your environment.  Rather than depend on time, concentrate more on how your dough looks like.

3.  If the weather is cold, try proving your dough inside the oven.  Turn the oven on at 200 deg C for 1 minute.  Turn off then place your covered bowl inside.  (I usually repeat this process after an hour if my dough hasn't risen enough yet and the oven has gone cold again.)

4.  To be sure that your ensaymada is fully baked, use a cooking thermometer.  A baked roll should have an internal temperature of about 88-93 degC (190-200 deg F).


5.  To make half the recipe, use 8 eggyolks (4 each for Stages 2 and 3).

SPECIAL ENSAYMADA (makes 20-24 medium-sized ensaymadas)

From top left (counterclockwise): Newly-coiled dough; risen dough; just out of the oven; buttered and sprinkled with sugar; cut in half; ensaymada with cheese topping

STAGE 1

In a small bowl, combine: 
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon active dry or instant yeast
1/2 cup warm water (about 100-110 deg F or 38-43 deg C)
1/2 tablespoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt

Let stand until it bubbles, about 15 minutes.

Then add:
1/4 cup room temperature or slightly warm whole milk
3/4 cup bread flour

Mix thoroughly then let rise to about double in volume, about 30 minutes.

LEFT: Foamy yeast mixture; RIGHT: yeast mixture with the addition of milk and bread flour, now double in volume

STAGE 2

In a large mixing bowl, combine:
8 eggyolks (at room temperature)
2/3 cup granulated white sugar
1 cup bread flour
mixture from Stage 1

Mix, cover, then let rise to about double in volume again, about 30-60 minutes.

LEFT: with eggyolks, sugar, bread flour and mixture from Stage 1; RIGHT: after mixture doubled in volume

STAGE 3

Add, one by one, to mixture in Stage 2:
9 eggyolks
1/2 cup granulated white sugar
1 cup softened butter
3 cups bread flour

Using an electric mixer fitted with a paddle attachment, mix until everything is well incorporated.  Switch to a dough hook, then gradually add up to 1 cup more of bread flour until you achieve the right consistency of a soft and quite sticky dough. (You may not have to add all of the extra flour.  Do not be tempted to keep adding flour or you will end up with a heavy dough).  If the dough is too sticky to handle, leave it for a few minutes then knead again until manageable.

Alternatively (if you do not have a dough hook), transfer the dough onto a slightly floured working surface then knead the mix manually while gradually adding the extra bread flour.  Knead until the desired consistency is achieved.

Form the dough into a ball then let rise in a lightly greased bowl, about 1 1/2 hours.  Cover the bowl with cling wrap or a clean towel.

LEFT: with the addition of more eggyolks, sugar, butter and bread flour; RIGHT: after kneading, ready for proving
After proving

STAGE 4

Punch down the dough. Divide into equal portions.  For medium-sized ensaymadas, a portion would be around 70-80 grams.  You will be able to make around 20-24.  For muffin-sized portions, about 25-30g is enough.

From top left (clockwise): portioned dough; flattened and stretched; buttered and rolled; coiled; shaped like an "S"
Grease ensaymada moulds or muffin pans.

Get one portion and flatten with a rolling pin. (Again, if the dough is too soft or sticks to the rolling pin, leave it for a few minutes then try again.) Start rolling lightly then more heavily until dough is fully stretched lengthwise.

Brush dough surface with a generous amount of softened butter.

Carefully roll the dough from one end of the long side to the other end.  Shape into a coil with outer end tucked in.  You can also form the roll into an "S" shape.

Place in mould.

Once all portions are shaped, let sit, covered loosely with cling wrap, to rise for the last time, about 2 hours.

Coiled dough after proving. As you can see, the coils look like they have melded.  If the coils are separated and distinct, it can mean that too much flour has been added and the ensaymadas might be tough.

BAKING

Bake ensaymadas in a preheated 300 deg F (150 deg C) oven for 20-25 minutes.

Nice and golden!

You can tell that it's soft just by looking at it!
Let cool for a few minutes then remove from moulds.  When completely cool, brush with softened butter, sprinkle with sugar, then top with grated aged edam, vintage, or extra tasty cheddar cheese.

If not eating immediately, wrap ensaymadas individually in wax paper.


Before eating, you can microwave an ensaymada for about 15 seconds to warm it up and to melt the cheese.

Enjoy with coffee or hot chocolate!



127 comments:

  1. Hi Corinne,

    thanks for sharing the recipe. i have tried looking for bread flour in supermarket here in manila but found none, can i use all-purpose flour instead?

    lin

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    Replies
    1. I thought bread flour was common in the Philippines. Anyway, if you really can't find it, yes, you can use all purpose flour. However, you might not get as much volume in your ensaymada.

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    2. I will let you know how it goes with the APF and at the latest, I am still searching for bread flour here. Thanks again and God Bless. :)

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    3. You buy it in the palengke and not in the supermarket. Tell them to give you "primera" as it is commonly known. You can buy it by the kilo. Segunda is all purpose. Hope that helps!


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    4. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    5. In the Philippines, bread flour is called "first class" flour and is usually sold in the market per kilo.

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  2. Corinne, please clarify stage 3. Do we have to mix what's in stage 2 to stage 3 using a paddle attachment of the mixer or do we have to mix stage 3 first in a separate bowl before adding stage 2 into it? Do we add a cup of flour as needed? Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've edited the procedure. Hope it is clearer.

      Yes, add up to a cup of flour until you get the right consistency.

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    2. Hi Corrine.i am desperate to make ensaymada :) question please the eggyolks to use in your recipe total of 17 eggyolk? 8 eggyolks for step 2 and 9 eggyolk for step 3.

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    3. Yes, a total of 17. I suggest you make half the recipe for your first try.

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    4. Hi corinne, in stage 3 aside from the 3cups flour, we need to add an extra more/ less 1 cup as needed? Please .thank you

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  3. Hi corrine, for the half recipe all the measurements are the same the flour, sugar etc. except for the eggs?

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    Replies
    1. Use 8 eggyolks and half of everything else.

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    2. Hi Corrine,

      I intend to make half of this recipe for my first try. Would I use 8 egg yolks in total or 11? Thanks.

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    3. 8 eggyolks in total. Please refer to the notes before the recipe (#5).

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  4. Hi Corrine, May I ask what's the size/diameter of your brioche moulds? Thanks so much!!

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    Replies
    1. I used mamon moulds for the ensaymadas in the photos. They are 4" in diameter.

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  5. Hi Corinne! Is it okay to use margarine instead of butter? Butter is waaaaaay too expensive and I can't use butter everytime I bake, which is almost twice a week!!

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    Replies
    1. Margarine does not taste like butter so while you may use it, you will not get the buttery goodness of real ensaymada.

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  6. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  7. If i use self raising flour instead of bread flour, is the yeast still necessary?

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    Replies
    1. You cannot use self-raising flour for this purpose. Yeast is used as leavening for bread not baking powder (which is what self-raising flour has).

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  8. Hello there, I hope you are well, just wanted to say that this recipe worked for me and it was truly very nice, thanks for posting such detailed instruction. I wanted to ask as well if you know how long this will keep outside the fridge once cooked ? I've used the cheddar so I think I may use the queso de bola next time as I'm sure that will last longer. I've also frozen half of the dough after Stage 3 proving as it's only myself and my husband who's thoroughly enjoyed it.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. To be honest, I don't really know how long it will keep! I know bread generally dries out quicker in the fridge but I do prefer keeping it there. Maybe put it in an airtight container? Reheat in microwave or better yet, pan grill it!

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  9. where can i get those aluminum pans?

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    Replies
    1. I bought my moulds in the Philippines, at Chocolate Factory in Cubao.

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  10. Hi corinne, i was wonder what kind of butter did you use because when i went to the store they had unsalted and salted butter? Is there a difference? Thanks:-)

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    Replies
    1. I use salted butter for this recipe. When I mean regular butter, I usually just write 'butter' in the recipe. In some cake recipes here, you will see 'unsalted'.

      You can use any of the two kinds. However, for me, the saltiness in the butter balances the sweetness in the ensaymada

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  11. Hi corrine! I just want to clarify. In stage 3 aside from the 3 cups of bread flour, i have to add in an extra cup? It's quite confusing for me since it's my first time to bake an ensaymada. Anyway, thanks in advance!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, that's an extra cup. But you only add enough till you get the right consistency of the dough. You may or may not need the full 1 cup.

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  12. Hi. Where can I find the right cheese? Does it have another name?

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    Replies
    1. As mentioned in the post, what is traditionally used as a topping is aged edam but you can use any strong or vintage cheese. Or whatever cheese you like!

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  13. Hi Corinne...... hope u had a great day..... tnx a lot for this detailed recipe...
    the first time I baked this--olah! ....it turned out quite so good by simply following ur instruction and ingredients (half of all the measurement).... my kids enjoyed and loved it...

    this is the kind of texture of bread for ensaymada that am really up to.....
    tnk u so very much.....������������

    be a blessing and be blessed....

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  14. you can buy bread flour in Simply Bread/Baker's Depot located in Robinson's Ermita

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  15. hi i cant find whole milk whats the perfect substitute to that?

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    Replies
    1. Whole milk is the same as fresh milk or full cream milk. You can find that at any supermarket.

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  16. HI can i use evaporated milk? Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Usually, a substitute for whole milk is half evap and half water. For this recipe, you need 1/4 cup whole milk. You can use 1/8 cup evap plus 1/8 cup water.

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    2. Wow this recipe is A-mazing!!! It's the perfect consistency and taste. I feel like i bought it from the Philippines!! Yay! Been looking for ensaymada here where i live, but it's a small city with only 1 filipino eestaurant and no ensaymada! 2yrs have not tasted this. Im just so happy. Thanks for sharing! ��

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    3. Glad you enjoyed it! Thanks for the feedback.

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  17. hi Corinne, i would like to ask ,how many cups of bread flour in total? thanks?

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    Replies
    1. 3/4 + 1 + 3 = 4 3/4 cups bread flour PLUS up to one more cup additional until right consistency of dough is achieved.

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  18. Corrine, I think you should try making pastel (a pride of Cagayan de Oro) out of this recipe. Perhaps you need to do a bit of tweaking because pastel is not as soft, although still tender. It looks a bit like a dinner roll, only it has a good amount of yema filling.[-:

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    1. Never tried that. I'll see what I can find out about it first.

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  19. I love this recipe! First time to try it and it went perfect! Soft and the taste is just right. It does takes long hours to prepare but worth it. The only cons is what To do with the 17 egg whites not used? :)

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Macarons, lengua de gato, angel food cake, white cake, meringue cookies, pavlova? You can freeze the eggwhites for use later.

      I only make ensaymada when I have leftover eggyolks from making buttercream so it's not really a problem for me.

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  20. Hi. just wondering what will happen if I lessen the amount of yeast? I noticed that there's an after taste. I can taste the yeast after finishing the the ensaymada.

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    Replies
    1. It will most likely take even longer to rise.

      If your ensaymada had a "yeasty" taste then mostly likely, you left it to rise for too long and not because there's too much yeast.

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  21. Hi Corrine, how do you prevent the sides from browning too much. Yours appear to be brown only on the top. Thank you.

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    Replies
    1. What do you bake your ensaymadas in? Dark, non stick moulds absorb more heat hence making the sides more brown. If you are using them, lower the oven temperature by 10-20 degrees C and see how it goes.

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  22. I used the non-stick aluminum 4 inch tart tin brushed with butter and baked under convection bake setting. I will lower it to 10-20 degrees C and update you of the result. Thank you much Corrine.

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  23. Is it okay to put the dough after Stage 3 in the fridge and bake it the following day?

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    Replies
    1. I've never done this myself but I know of someone who puts the dough in the fridge overnight. I suppose you can - just let the dough come to room temperature before proceeding to Step 4.

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  24. Hi Corrine, gaano po katagal pede store ang ensaymada bago masira?

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    Replies
    1. I'm sorry I really don't know. I usually just store leftovers in the fridge so they will last longer. Then I either heat it in the microwave or pan grill it.

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  25. Hi Corrine! May I ask how long should i bake using 3oz muffin pan? While my first batch is baking is it okay if the rest of the dough will wait at the counter since my oven can only fit 1 tray at a time? Thank you.

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    1. To be honest, i've not tried making muffin-sized ensaymadas. Maybe check at 10-15 minutes? I also bake one tray at a time. Just keep the other trays covered.

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  26. Hi corrien,
    If i use i stant yeast do i stil need to let it foam with warm water or just add all dry ingredients together?
    Tnx

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    Replies
    1. I suggest you do the procedure as is, regardless of whether you are using active or instant yeast.

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  27. hi! i would love to try this recipe... but my question is, can i make the dough the night before and bake it the next day? will it have the same texture/result? and how do i store it if thats the case?
    thanks.
    gie

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    Replies
    1. My suggestion is for you to do it up to Stage 3 on day 1 then let the dough rise overnight in the fridge. Next day, take it out and let it come to room temperature then proceed to Stage 4.

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  28. Hi Corrine, What Australian brand of bread flour do you use for your Ensaymada? Thanks.

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    Replies
    1. I have tried different brands - Defiance and Lighthouse, both available in the supermarkets. I also currently use bread flour from Costco.

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    2. Thanks, Can't wait to buy the ingredients and start baking. Cheers!

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  29. Hi Corinne.. this recipe is perfect I am planning to make ensaymada this coming weekend.. I have question.. how long is the shelf life of the cook ensaymada? can you share recipe of lengua de gato, angel food cake, white cake, meringue cookies, pavlova.. so I can use my eggwhites.. :-) tnx a lot

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    Replies
    1. Sorry, I am not so sure about the shelf life. It is always best to eat ensaymada freshly baked but if you have leftovers, just wrap them up and keep in an airtight container in the fridge then heat up in microwave or pan grill before eating.

      Recipes for lengua de gato and angel food cake are on this blog. Please find them in the recipes page. For other eggwhite recipes, please use google.

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  30. ok.. thank you so much.. I am excited to make ensaymada.. let you know if I made it successfully.. :-)

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  31. Thank you, thank you and thank you very much for sharing Corinne! I have been trying and looking for recipes for Ensaymada and had no luck until I tried yours. Although it was long and tedious, it was well worth it at the end. I even put in Ube Halaya when I rolled the ensaymada. Afterwards, the result was sweet smelling and oh soooo delicious!!! thank you once again for sharing! I shall try your other recipes too! ;-)

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    1. Hi did you put the butter as well with the ube?

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  32. Hello, can u pls give the measurements of all ingredients in grams as im not sure wether cup size are standard.tnx

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    Replies
    1. Sorry I am unable to convert the measurements into grams at this time. Just so you know though, I am using 250 mls measuring cup and my teaspoon and tablepoons are 5mls and 15mls, respectively. Hope that helps for now.

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  33. Hi corrine, thanks alot for sharing your recipe. I will use this for my business. I'm glad to read your profile becoz we have a lot in common like, 3 boys n i girl, harry potter stuff, loves baking and sewing bags. I also created different designs.

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  34. It's my first time to make a comment on a blog like this please be patient. I'm not sure if my first comment was successful or not but anyway to be sure I will send this question again. I tried your ensaymada half of the recipe and its too oily for me. Im not sure if it is bcoz, i over rest the dough or its really oily at the bottom of the muffin linner. It was too late already when i prepared it and i have to wait for another 2 hrs. And that would be 3:00 am already so i baked it in the morning at 5:30 actually it became too bubbly also so i pitch it a little to reduced the air inside. If ever i did it again, can i reduce the butter, for how many? Or should i just roll the dough without brushing the surface with a butter? Thanks again.

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    Replies
    1. Firstly, I cannot recommend reducing the butter because I personally have not done that. Real ensaymada is supposed to be buttery (though I wouldn't say oily). Reducing the butter will not only affect the taste but the texture of the ensaymada as well.

      Did you use greased muffin tins? I reckon, the "oil" in the bottom is actually from the greasing and not from the ensaymada itself.

      Also,you should avoid overproofing your dough. Next time, I would suggest for you to just put your dough in the fridge overnight so that it will rise slowly then you can continue with the process in the morning. (Refer to this post: http://pinoyinoz.blogspot.com.au/2015/03/eggyolks-and-how-i-sometimes-not-waste.html).

      If you are not happy with this recipe, maybe you can try other recipes so you can compare.

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  35. For each of the proofing steps, is the objective to simply get the dough to double in size?

    (Sorry if this comment appeared twice, not sure what happened the first time)

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    Replies
    1. The objective of proving a dough is NOT simply to double its size just for the sake of it. It creates the structure and texture of the bread as well as develops its flavour. Underproving will result in a hard, dense bread with little volume while overproving will create bread that has holes, a crumbly texture and a yeasty taste.

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    2. Right, I see that volume is not the goal, but is it the guideline in terms of waiting times? Because as you mentioned in the instructions, each suggested proofing time will vary in practice depending on the warmth in your kitchen and etc. So how do we know when proofing is done? When it doubles in volume?

      Also I tried this recipe for the first time yesterday and it came out really great. The texture is pillowy and soft!

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    3. Yes, when double in volume.

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  36. Hi Corinne,

    After 4 attempts (4th using yours but only 1/4 the recipe - over measured flour so semi-fail), my 5th go (half recipe) is finally a success!! Why did I ever hesitate to try yours in the first place!!!?? All previous recipes (except for one which I chucked, tasted awful - instant yeast mixed to dry ingredients. skipped 1st stage) tasted good but the texture was cakey (using all purpose flour / mashed potato - you told me so!! lol).
    6th & 7th batches (half recipes - scared to waste eggs in case its a flop!) lovingly made & shared with friends at get togethers the past consecutive weekends were received with OMGs and heavenly sighs haha...makes the effort worthwhile/sulit!

    Thank you for sharing your talent & God bless you ever more xo Thesa Sydney

    P.S. have you ever tried to make pandesal? tried an "easy" recipe with APF, soft & yummy but not quite the ONE... my son ate it but "it's not quite the same as the one from the Phil bakery, Mum" haha (crunchy crust, soft & hollow inside..oh my)

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  37. Very informative recipe! I will try this. Is it proving or proofing?

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  38. Hi ms. Corrine ask ko lang po what kind of cheese yung ginamit nyo? I used mild.cheddar cheese before, but im.just wondering what kind you used? Thank you=)

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    Replies
    1. I use vintage cheddar most times.

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  39. I'm not a baker but my ensaymadas came out very soft and tasty! Your recipe is foolproof!
    However, the top browned a little bit too much. Do you have any ideas why this happened? What can I do to remedy this?

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    Replies
    1. Lower the oven temperature and bake for longer.

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  40. Sige try ko din po yan Salamat sa recipe =)

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  41. Hi Corrine!

    Thank you so much for sharing this recipe. I followed every step and my ensaymadas turned out yummy and good.

    Geraldine

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  42. Hi Corrine!

    I've tried your mamon,ube cupcakes and cake, they are so good! Thanks for the recipe. I was wondering if you have the time to give me a specific amount of half of everything in the recipe? I just don't want to get it wrong since i'm still learning to bake. Thanks in advance.

    Hazel

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    Replies
    1. I think you will not have a problem simply dividing everything by 2. For the eggyolks, just use 4 eggyolks each for Stages 2 and 3.

      Delete
  43. Hi, Corrine,
    I measure my ingredients using a scale and I worked out this recipe so that the result will be the same.
    Here is my break down by stages.

    Stage I
    Instructions under "in a small bowl", everything is as written.

    Instructions under "then add" are the following measurement.
    1/4 cup whole milk, at room temperature or slightly warm (no change)
    3/4 cup Bread Flour (3.3 oz) or (95 grams)

    Stage 2
    In a large bowl :
    8 egg yolks at room temperature (No Change)
    2/3 cup granulated sugar (1cup) or (5oz)
    1 cup bread flour (41/4 oz) or (120 grams)


    Stage 3
    Add one by one, to mixture in Stage 2
    9 egg yolks (No Change)
    1/2 granulated sugar (3.5 oz)
    1 cup softened butter (8 oz) or (8 oz) or (226 grams)
    3 cups bread flour (12.75) or (360 grams)

    This are the measurements that I used. I hope it helps those bakers who wants to use their scale.
    I wrapped and froze 15 ENSAYMADAS. I j warm it up 15 seconds and it was as good as yesterday.
    Thank you again for a great recipe.













    1/:










    ReplyDelete
  44. Hi Corrine,
    I found a great site for purchasing quality, economical, and good selection Gobel brioche moulds. It's www.BakeDeco.com. They carry several sizes.
    I already have 12 Gobel brioche moulds that I purchased from Amazon but is currently out of stock and no time line on restocking.
    Since your recipe is fabulous, I decide to purchase 26 more molds (I can use it to make my French brioche too) at $1.95 each. Free shipping if you purchase $49.99 +.
    Your ENSAYMADA is what everyone requested for thanksgiving and they want some to take home too. Lol!!!
    Freezes them for later. Will keep about 2 months (doubt if it will last that long) because it's so rich and moist.
    Go to BakerDeco. Com and click search- Gobel Heavy-Tinned-Steel Fluted Brioche Mold
    It will show all their sizes.
    Thank you and happy shopping.
    On Stage 3 of this recipe it says :
    1/2 cup of granulated sugar (3.5 oz) or (100 grams)
    Forgot to type the gram part.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Monina,

      What should be the perfect size of the gobel broche moulds to buy? Thanks.

      Delete
  45. Hi Corinne,
    I tried your recipe and turn out runny. Even I put on the fridge.I don't know whatis the problem? 911

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Are you sure you used the correct amount of ingredients and followed the instructions accurately?

      Delete
  46. I followed everything that is written there, but it turns out runny. I made it twice already and it's the same result. I have no idea why. Any suggestions?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Are you sure you added the extra one cup bread flour in Stage 3?

      To be honest, I don't really know what else to tell you. The recipe is as is. Maybe you should try a different ensaymada recipe.

      Delete
  47. Hey Corrine! Thanks for the recipe, I think I'm going to give it a try this weekend. Was just wondering, would it be alright for me to bake this in a tray like I would cinnamon rolls? Or do they absolutely have to be baked in single molds? Hope to hear back soon, thanks!

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  48. Thank you for sharing this recipe Corrine, the best ever! I baked this twice already using this recipe. The first try following the recipe and procedure as is and it baked perfectly and delicious; while the second try I use all purpose flour instead because I ran out of stocks of bread flour at that time and after stage 3 procedure I stopped and let my dough rise in the fridge overnight (since its already late night). And as soon as I got up the next morning, I took the bowl out of the fridge, placed in the kitchen counter, and let the dough come to room temp for two hours before doing stage 4. This time I decided not to use moulds anymore but simply shaping the dough into an S shape and put it directly on a sheet pan lined with baking paper...and it baked perfectly as well, the texture is pillowsoft, very delicious as compared to my first attempt. Personally I like the tastes and texture better using the AP flour rather than the bread flour. Heavenly! Thank you Corrine!

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  49. this is so perfect! thanks corine 😊
    please post ka naman corine ng recipe for Pandesal, hehe kasi yung ginawa ko hindi katulad sa atin sa pinas.hahaha as in palpak! thanks

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  50. Thanks Corrine for the recipe! My family loved and enjoyed it! They like the bread softness and texture. So happy

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  51. How do we make butter cream from egg whites?

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    Replies
    1. Search for my Swiss meringue buttercream recipe here.

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  52. Hi Corrine. I made your Ensaymada recipe and I only used half of this recipe. It turned out very good. Thank you so much for sharing this recipe. And I'm planning to make the whole recipe now but I have one question, did you bake the 24 pcs ensaymadas in just one baking time or you split them into two? If you bake it at one time, did you alternate the pans in the middle of the baking time?

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  53. Thank you so much for your quick reply. Godbless!

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  54. Hi Corrine, I have a question, I tried using and followed your recipe, it went well. I just finished stage 3 and I can't do the rest, I have headache. Can I store the dough in the refrigerator. Really need your help. Thank you.

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    Replies
    1. Yes, you can. Just bring to room temperature before you proceed to the next stage.

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  55. Hi Corinne, can I use bread maker? How possible is that. Let me know. Thanks.

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    Replies
    1. Sorry, I have not tried using a breadmaker with this recipe.

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  56. Thanks you. I'll still do the old fashion way just like my Aunt. I really admire your designs. Great!!!

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  57. Hi Corinne
    I would like to ask what do you mean by using the term, one by one, as per stage 3. Look forward to your answer. Thank you very much.

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    1. You don't dump in all the ingredients all at once. First the eggyolks then the sugar then the butter then the flour.

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    2. Thank you very much. That is what i was thinking but needed to be sure. Ingat.

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  58. I followed your instructions to the tee and it came out perfect! I thought it's better than most of the ensaymadas being sold here in Calgary. It turned out soft and melts in your mouth. I would think it will keep for long but I guess I will never find out because it's all gone in a day! Thank you for sharing your great recipes!

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  59. hi Corrine, is it possible to use instant yeast for ensaymada? your ensaymada looks so rich and im sure its tasty. thanks

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    1. Stage 1 ingredients say 'active or instant yeast' so yes, you can use it.

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  60. I just made your ensaymada. it really melts in my mouth. thank you very much for the recipe.

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  61. I'm a bit confused with the 1 cup of butter, should i mix all the 1 cup butter to the dough or it will be divided for brushing before and after the baking? Anyway i like baking these recipes you have here. I always use your sponge cake for all the cake i made, and people wonder why i have soft and juicy cake i replied its just the same like others, but of course we have different ingredients in Finland that some thinks i'm using different cake recipes from normal recipes here. Just love following your recipes.

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    1. The one cup of butter is for the dough.

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  62. i was puzzled. one of the blogger, states she uses 17 eggyolks all in all, while in the written recipe its only 12 eggyolks used. 8 yolks for stage 2 and 4 yolks in stage 3.

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    1. There are 17 eggyolks, 8 for stage 2 and 9 for stage 3. Please read the recipe again closely.

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  63. hi corinne... just want to ask what is the size of your muffin molds?

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    1. The molds are around 4 1/2" across the top.

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